University of Hawaii at Manoa LibraryLibrary CatalogResearch ToolsAsk Us Skip to main content

Workshop on Japanese Old and Rare Books in the Honolulu Museum of Art 2017 (Kotenseki Workshop at HoMA 2017): Abstract 要旨

The Kotenseki Workshop at the Honolulu Museum of Art (HoMA) 2017 sponsored by the University of Hawaii at Manoa East Asian Languages & Literatures (EALL), UHM Library, HoMA, and the National Institute of Japanese Literature (NIJL) was held on February 17,

Abstracts

"The Plot of The Tale of Genji and the Emperor System 源氏物語のストーリーと天皇制" was delivered by Dr. Yuichiro Imanishi, Director-General of the NIJL on February 16, 2017 at the University of Hawaii at Hawaii Library.

Abstract in English

Written at the beginning of the 11th century, The Tale of Genji (源氏物語), takes as its setting Japan’s Heian court. The tale depicts the Emperor and the inner palace when the splendor of court culture was at its peak, before bushi, the armed warrior class, began to put pressure on this group of elites. It is these depictions which produced the foundation of Japanese culture that would follow.

However, this splendid court tale is not simply an inventory of courtly traditions without any internal contradictions. The story begins with an adaptation of Bai Juyi’s Song of Everlasting Sorrow (長恨歌), a long poem which tells of Emperor Xuanzong of the Tang dynasty’s tragic affair with Yang Guifei. Hikaru Genji, the main character of the The Tale of Genji is the child born of a similar affair between the emperor of Japan and Kiritsubo no Koi. Genji turns his affections to his step-mother (Fujitsubo) whom his father brings to court in place of Genji’s deceased mother. Eventually, Genji fathers a child with his step mother. They keep the relationship between father and son a secret, and their child rises to the throne. To tell such a tale of the court was unprecedented at the time of Genji’s composition, and it remains an unparalleled feat in the history of Japanese literature.

The plot of Genji runs absolutely counter to the myth of the unbroken imperial line which grew quite powerful in Japan’s early modern era. It follows that in the period of ultra-nationalism before the Pacific War, The Tale of Genji was stripped from textbooks and labeled subversive. While it is easy to dismiss such ultra-nationalism, that will not help us understand how such a story was composed in the courts of the Heian period, or how it garnered enough praise for even the emperor of the time to have deemed it worthy of reading. These questions have still yet to be answered.

Several interesting theories have been proposed about this, which I will present today. However, at some point, these questions vanished from the academic world. Now, there are no researchers taking up such questions.

Though it’s a fiction, how could a story that depicts imperial succession so disrespectfully have been written? Was it accepted as pure fabrication? Merely the workings of the author’s imagination? While that might be tenable if it were a work of early modern literature, it’s quite difficult to imagine such in the case of something written in ancient times.

It is my personal opinion that this story traces a shared but unspoken knowledge of prior history of imperial lineage, and because of that, this shocking story was accepted in its time.

This “unspoken knowledge” is, I believe, the rumored change in bloodlines that occurred when the Yōzei Emperor was replaced by his grandfather’s younger brother, the Kōkō Emperor. This sort of troubling switch of imperial bloodlines is a rare occurrence in the history of Japan. While scholars of Japanese history have from early on pointed out the importance of this change, scholars of Japanese literature have never attempted to approach this problem directly. Using interpretations of The Tales of Ise (伊勢物語), a work even older than Genji, I will attempt to explain how The Tale of Genji relates to these problems of imperial lineage.

 

日本語講演要旨

『源氏物語』は11世紀始めに書かれた、日本の平安時代の宮廷を舞台とする物語である。

まだ「武士」といわれる新興武力勢力が宮廷を圧迫するようになる前の、天皇とその後宮を中心とする、華やかな貴族文化の最盛期を描いて、後世の日本文化の基本を作り出した作品であった。

 しかし、その華やかな宮廷物語は、緊張を欠いた単なる宮廷風俗の羅列ではない。ストーリーは、中国唐の玄宗皇帝と楊貴妃の悲恋を歌った白居易の『長恨歌』の翻案に始まる。その悲恋の忘れ形見として遺されたのが、この物語の主人公光源氏である。そして主人公は、亡き母(桐壺の更衣)の代わりに父が後宮に迎えた継母(藤壺)に思いを寄せ、ついに継母との間に子をなし、その秘密は保たれたまま、やがてその子が天皇になるという、日本文学史上、空前絶後の展開を見せるのである。

 そのストーリーは、近代になって強化された「万世一系」の尊皇思想に背反する、とんでもない内容であった。したがって、太平洋戦争前の国粋主義横行時代には、『源氏物語』は、教科書から閉め出され、「不敬」の書のレッテルを貼られることになった。

 そのような国粋主義の不当を言い立てることは易しい。しかし、なぜそのようなストーリーが、平安時代の宮廷社会で書かれ、そして時の天皇の耳にも達するという評判を取ったのか、という問題は、それでは解決できない。疑問は未解決のままである。本講演で紹介するように、いくつかの魅力的な仮説は立てられてきた。だが、いつの間にかその問題は学会では不問に付され、その問題に取り組もうとする研究者も今日見当たらない。

 フィクションとはいえ、皇位継承の尊厳を傷つけるような物語は、なぜ書けたのか。

 それは、作者の頭に浮かんだ想像と創作なのだろうか。近代文学ならいざ知らず、古代文学においてはそのようなことを考えるのは、難しい。私見では、そのストーリーは、その時代に共有されていた過去の皇位継承をめぐる暗黙の了解に沿って構想されたものであり、だからこそ、驚くべきストーリーは許され、世に迎えられたのだと考えられる。

 「過去の皇位継承をめぐる暗黙の了解」とは、『源氏物語』から1世紀前に起こった皇統の交替、すなわち陽成天皇からその祖父の弟光孝天皇へという、日本歴史上まれに見る不可解な皇統交替をめぐる風説である。この皇統交替は、日本史研究者の間では早くよりその重大性が指摘されてきたが、国文学者の間ではその問題が正面から追求された事はない。『源氏物語』先立つ物語『伊勢物語』のテキスト解釈などを援用しながら、『源氏物語』が抱える上記の問題を読み解いてみたい。