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ENG 200: Advanced Composition -- Writing Identity: Journal Articles

OneSearch Manoa

OneSearch includes the UH Voyager Catalog plus a huge index of academic journals on most topics. Also includes conference papers, maps, government documents, music scores, DVDs, archives & manuscripts, and more. OneSearch does not find everything that the library has, but it is a useful starting point for looking for a wide variety of material.

Finding articles in the Hawaii Pacific Journal Index

Hawaii-Pacific Journal Index (HPJI)

  • As mentioned above, Voyager searches for the titles of journals, but it does not generally search for titles of articles within journals. Hawaii-Pacific Journal Index is one way to "look inside" journals. It is not a full-text database, but it does allows you to search the contents of more than 130 scholarly journals and "popular press" magazines published in or about Hawaiʻi and the Pacific. Most of these are not indexed anywhere else in the world. All of the searching in HPJI is by keyword, and covers the article titlejournal titleauthorjournal date, and an abstract/summary of each article.
  • The three most useful searches in HPJI are Keyword Anywhere, Author Name and Journal Name. In most cases, it is best to use the "advanced search" mode, rather than the "basic search," which is less flexible.
     
  • With a few exceptions, most of the magazines and journals indexed in the HPJI are only available in print; all are held by the Hawaiʻi and Pacific Collections in UHM library. Once you find an article in HPJI, look at the holdings information -- if there is an electronic version available (such as for Contemporary Pacific or the Journal of the Polynesian Society) a link should appear in the HPJI record. Otherwise, you will need to go back into the Voyager database, search for the journal title in basic search mode, and then use "Get This Item" to request the specific journal the article appears in. 
     
  • When working in HPJI, it's a good idea to have two windows open so that you can run HPJI and Voyager simultaneously; once you've found something in HPJI, you can then jump to Voyager to request the journal. Remember to save the publishing information (article title, journal title, issue date, page numbers) for all items you request: A year's worth of journals are often bound together; if you don't have this information with you when you come to look at the journal, you will waste a lot of time flipping through hundreds of pages looking for your article.

Google Scholar

Google Scholar

  • Google Scholar is another useful means of searching inside scholarly journals, and you will often find material here that is not indexed in HPJI (because Hawaii and Pacific scholars will sometimes publish articles in journals that are not specifically about Hawaiʻi or the Pacific).
  • Although you can reach Google Scholar on the open internet, it is best to log in through the library's electronic resources portal (use the link above) -- this is because the library's version of Google Scholar automatically recognizes articles that the library has paid for through its database subscriptions, and so you can immediately get the articles for free in full text. If you were to find the same articles using the open Internet version, you would be required to pay for access to the articles.
  • If you find an article in Google Scholar that the library doesn't subscribe to electronically, be sure to search in the Voyager catalog to see if we subscribe to the print version.

Selected Databases & Indexes

Mouse over link for database description. See also the Pacific Collection's "Selected Databases" page for other heavily used sources of Hawaiʻi/Pacific information. The majority of these databases and indexes require log-in with a UH-Mānoa ID.

The Contemporary Pacific online

The Contemporary Pacific is one of the world's premier journals of Pacific Studies. As UH students, you have access to all issues of the journal online. The most recent year's worth of issues can only be accessed via Project Muse (which requires a UH user name and password to log in); all others are freely available via UH Scholarspace.)