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Japan History: the Asia-Pacific War: Hoji Shinbun Digital Collection

Introduction: Japan and WWII resources

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Hoji Shinbun Digital Collection

Full image of Japanese American and other overseas Japanese newspapers in Asia and South America. There are many Japanese American newspapers published in Hawaii, many of which contain English language pages along with Japanese language pages.

Hoji Shinbun Hawaii list

Samples of Hoji Shinbun in Hawaii

Nippu Jiji / 日布時事 [The Nippu Jiji], (Honolulu, HI)

The Nippu Jiji was one of the two major Japanese newspapers in Hawaii (the other is Hawaii Hōchi) with a wide readership among Japanese migrant workers. The Nippu Jiji played a pivotal role in social movements in Hawaii's Japanese community. It was initially published as the Yamato (1895–96), later as Yamato Shinbun (1896–1906) before being renamed the Nippu Jiji (1906–42) under the leadership of Yasutarō Sōga; it later became Hawaii Times (1942–85). An English section was begun in 1919.

Hawaii Times / 布哇タイムス, (Honolulu, HI)

The Nippu Jiji continued to publish under US government censorship during WWII after having been temporarily shut down from December 11, 1941 until January 8, 1942. The Nippu Jiji was renamed to the Hawaii Times on November 2, 1942. President Yasutarō Sōga’s son Shigeo became the new president and the editor in chief on December 8, 1942. Although the Hawaii Times closed down in 1985, the Hawaii Times Photo Archives Foundation salvaged the publisher’s photo archives consisting of approximately 25,0000 photographs and related information.