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Mary Kawena Pukui Annotated Bibliography: 1970's

List of Publications

Pukui, Mary Kawena, E. W. Haertig, and Catherine A. Lee. Nānā I Ke Kumu: Look to the Source, Volume I. Honolulu: Hui Hānai, 1972.
Call number: DU624.5 .P84
 
Produced for the Queen Liliʻuokalani Children's Center as a resource for social workers, these two volumes were the result of meetings held at the center where Pukui would provide information about Hawaiian culture and life cycles. Included are anonymous stories from center clients. Volume 1 is arranged as an index.
Languages of publication: ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi and English
 
 
Pukui, Mary Kawena, E. S. Craighill Handy, and Elizabeth Green Handy. Native Planters in Old Hawaii: Their Life, Lore, and Environment. Honolulu: Bishop Museum Press, 1972.
Call number: AM101 B442 no.223
 
Starts with historical background of Hawaiians and their civilization in the islands in part 1 then goes into Hierarchical detail about different plants and animals used by Hawaiians in part 2. Part three goes into demographic details of the major islands and part 4 concerns the makahiki festival. Part 5 deals with descriptions of each inhabited island. Includes an appendix with plant and animal identifiers as well as a bibliography. Based upon Handy’s Hawaiian Planter volume 1 (1940) which utilized fieldwork conducted in the 1930’s. It isn’t entirely clear how much of the information in this book was provided by Pukui, but many sections resemble The Polynesian Family System.
Languages of publication: English with ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi given for many plants, animals, and some chants.
 

Pukui, Mary Kawena. The Echo of Our Song: Chants and Poems of the Hawaiians. Honolulu: University Press of Hawaii, 1973.
Call number: PL 6448.6 P8
 
Organized by a combination of theme and chronology, this collection includes chants composed on a variety of topics and themes. Written by ali‘i and commoner alike, these chants span about 100 years. Appendix includes notes and commentaries on the chants including possible kaona as well as historical/mythic significance. Special attention is paid to hymns, hula of the day, and compositions from newspapers.
Languages of publication: ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi and English
 

Pukui, Mary Kawena, Samuel H. Elbert, and Esther T. Mookini. Place Names of Hawaii. Honolulu: University Press of Hawaii, 1974.
Call number: DU 622 .P8 1974
 
Provides, in alphabetical order, place names of Hawai‘i including: meaning, when known; historical significance, and legendary background if applicable. Elbert states that 86 percent of place names in Hawai‘i are in the Hawaiian language. Much larger than the original supplement to the Hawaiian dictionary. Provides information on many of the US military bases throughout the islands,
including who they are named after and what the land was originally called.
Languages of publication: ʻŌlelo Hawai‘i and English.
 
 
Pukui, Mary Kawena, Samuel H. Elbert, and Esther T. Mookini. The Pocket Hawaiian Dictionary: With a Concise Hawaiian Grammar. Honolulu: University Press of Hawaii, 1975.
Call number: PL 6446 P84 1975
 
Hawaiian-English, English-Hawaiian, Hawaiian names borrowed from English, and a grammar of the Hawaiian language. According to the preface the words chosen for the pocket dictionary were done so because of their “frequency of use in the contemporary Hawaiian scene.” Also, the book is intended for residents, island visitors, and beginning students of the Hawaiian language.
Languages of publication: ʻŌlelo Hawai‘i and English
 
 
Pukui, Mary Kawena. “Aspects of the Word Lei.” In: Directions in Pacific Traditional Literature: Essays in Honor of Latharine Luomala, edited by Adriene L. Kaeppler and H. Arlo Nimmo, 103 – 115. Bernice P. Bishop Museum Special Publication 62. Honolulu, Hawaii, 1976.
Call number: GR 99.6 D57
 
A transcription of a tape made in 1962, this article reveals Pukui’s wide knowledge about lei. She includes lei chants, discusses usage and moʻolelo related to the lehua, hala, limu kala, loke Hawaiʻi, ʻilima, maile, and waikahuli; and expounds upon contemporary customs related to lei such as kissing.
Languages of publication: English with chants in both ʻŌlelo Hawai‘i with English translations
 

Kamakau, Samuel Manaiakalani. Hana a Ka Po‘e Kahiko: The Works of the People of Old. Honolulu: Bishop Museum Press, 1976.
Call number: DU 624.65 .K35 1976
 
Pukui’s translations are from Nupepa Ke Au ‘Oko‘a. Contains Kamakau’s descriptions of the Hawaiian calendar, plant cultivation, fishing, various crafts, and the places Hawaiians worshiped the Gods. Contains a glossary of Hawaiian words and terms. Includes publication dates for Kamaka’s original articles. Includes a bibliography of literature cited in notes.
Languages of publication: English, some chants and stories presented in ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi with English translations.
 

Pukui, Mary Kawena, and Samuel H. Elbert. Hawaiian Grammar. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1979.
Call number: PL 6443 .E37 1979
 
Expansion of the “Notes on Hawaiian Grammar” contained in previous editions of the Hawaiian-English Dictionary. Includes a genealogy of texts that looked at Hawaiian grammar before going into the grammatical details of the language. In the preface Elbert mentions that the principal texts used to study grammar were Elbert’s Selections from Fornander’s Hawaiian Antiquities and Folk-lore, Moses Nakuina’s retelling of Paka‘a, The Wind Gourd of La‘amaomao, and essays by Kahekina Kelekona (John G.M. Sheldon) concerning the changes in Hawai‘i as well as his account of Ko‘olau the leper.
Languages of Publication: ʻŌlelo Hawai‘i and English
 

Pukui, Mary Kawena, E. W. Haertig, and Catherine A. Lee. Nānā I Ke Kumu: Look to the Source, Volume II. Honolulu: Hui Hānai, 1972.
Call number: DU624.5 .P84
 
Produced for the Queen Liliʻuokalani Children's Center as a resource for social workers, these two volumes were the result of meetings held at the center where Pukui would provide information about Hawaiian culture and life cycles. Included are anonymous stories from center clients. Volume II is broken down by life cycle areas such as:
pregnancy and birth, shame, etc ...
Languages of publication: ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi and English

Bibliography Information

D. Kealiʻi MacKenzie

This bibliography was written by D. Kealiʻi MacKenzie. It was originally compiled as a project for Hawaiian Studies 203: Review of Hawaiian Literature, in Spring 2011, as such it was completed in April of that year. Kealiʻi deposited the content of the bibliography in to this guide, and allowed the UHM Library to continue to make this content available to the public. Questions or comments may be directed to Dore Minatodani, at dorem@hawaii.edu, or (808) 956-2852.